LDS Site of the Week – GARDEN TOMB, Israel

Posted by on Apr 24, 2011 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

In celebrating the resurrection of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, this Easter Sunday – THE GARDEN TOMB & Resurrection Garden; GOLGOTHA A beautiful & peaceful garden shielded by buildings and a steep escarpment from the noisy and vigorous city all around.  Located a short block north of the Damascus Gate on the Nablus road, was discovered in 1895 by General Gordon while walking along the old city wall.  General Gordon first noticed the distinctive skull features of Golgotha, the garden was subsequently discovered.  A large in-ground water cistern and a wine press have also been found.  These items suggest the ancient use of this property as a garden.  Inside the area, is a chiseled-out tomb.  Jewish tombs were often composed of two chambers; the first served as a vestibule, and in it the relatives congregated to mourn for the dead; in the second, on a shelf cut into the rock, the corpse was laid.  The entrance to the monument was closed by a round massive slab, like a millstone, which rolled in a grove. •    Jesus was buried in a garden (Matt. 27:57-66; Mark 15:42-47; Luke 23:50-56; John 19:41-42) •    Jesus’ tomb was guarded (Matt 27:62-66) •    “Who shall roll us away the stone….?”  (Mark 16:3-4) •    Mary Magdalene saw the resurrected Christ in the garden (Mark 16:9; John 20:11-18) •    Peter and John raced to the garden (Luke 24:12; John 20:1-4) •    Jesus was resurrected (Matt. 28:1-15; Mark 16:1-11; Luke 24:1-12; John 20:1-18) •    Nephi prophesied Jesus’ entombment (2 Nephi 25:13) •    Jesus was resurrected (2 Nephi 25:13; Ether 12:7; D&C 20:23) In this garden, the Jerusalem Branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized in September 1972 by President Harold B. Lee, with David B. Galbraith as the first president of the branch.  Of his visit to the Garden Tomb, President Lee said, “something seemed to impress us as we stood there that this was the holiest place of all, and we fancied we could have witnessed the dramatic scene that took place there” (The Ensign, April 1972, p. 6).  [DWB p. 62.] Today, the site is owned and operated by an association group of churches from Britain.  The land was purchased “that it might be kept sacred as a quiet spot.”  Since then, the Garden Tomb Association has been proclaiming the very heart of the Christian faith, the dying and living of the Lord Jesus Christ.  A door has been hung in recent years at the entrance to the tomb and carries a sign inscribed with a verse from the Bible that touches the heart of Christ’s Gospel: He is not here, for He is...

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Glimpse of the Past – LDS Church History April 21-30

Posted by on Apr 24, 2011 in Glimpse of the Past - LDS Church History | 0 comments

April 24, 1834 – On this and the following six days the mob burned about one hundred and fifty houses belonging to the Saints in Jackson County, Missouri. April 26, 1839 – Early in the morning a conference was held on the Temple site at Far West, Mo., in fulfillment of the revelation given July 8, 1838. Among those present were Apostles Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Orson Pratt, John E. Page and John Taylor, who ordained Wilford Woodruff and George A. Smith Apostles, “to fill the places of those who had fallen.” Alpheus Cutler, the master-workman of the Temple, then commenced laying its foundation, in accordance with revelation, by rolling up a large stone near the southeast corner. April 21, 1840 – The Postmaster General at Washington, D.C., changed the name of the postoffice at Commerce, Hancock Co., Ill., to Nauvoo, and appointed George W. Robinson postmaster. April 21, 1841 – Apostles Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Orson Pratt, Wilford Woodruff, John Taylor, Geo. A. Smith and Willard Richards sailed from Liverpool, England, on the ship Rochester, accompanied by 130 Saints. They arrived at New York May 20th. April 30, 1846 – The Nauvoo Temple was dedicated privately, Elder Joseph Young offering the dedicatory prayer. April 29, 1852 – The Deseret Iron Company was organized at Liverpool, England, and Erastus Snow and Franklin D. Richards were appointed general agents and managers of the same. Taken from Andrew Jenson’s:  Church...

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LDS Site of the Week – ORSON HYDE MEMORIAL GARDEN, JERUSALEM

Posted by on Apr 15, 2011 in Site of the Week - LDS Church History Tour | 0 comments

On April 15, 1840, Apostle Orson Hyde left Commerce, Ill., on his mission to Jerusalem.  This week’s site is dedicated to him and his mission there.  ORSON HYDE MEMORIAL PARK/GARDEN Located on the Mt of Olives, just below the BYU Center.  On October 24, 1979, President Spencer W. Kimball and 2000 other Church officials and members gathered here to dedicate the Orson Hyde Memorial Garden, a 5.5 acre park developed with a $1 million gift from the Orson Hyde Foundation, headed by Apostle LeGrand Richards.  The Garden was one of the largest and most prestigious parts of the Jerusalem National Park, a greenbelt of small parks and landscaped gardens around the Old City.  It features a 150-seat stone amphitheater near the top of the Garden and on the north side of the amphitheater a bronze plaque was placed with excerpts of Elder Hyde’s prayer in English and Hebrew.  The plaque has since been removed due to vandalism most likely caused by hurt feelings over misunderstandings from things said in the prayer.  The wall that held the plaque now has an obvious empty space where the plaque was encased.  Olive trees and other indigenous vegetation are growing throughout the park and a stone path winds back and forth in a gradual descent to the lower slope of the Mount of Olives and the Garden of Gethsemane. DWB p....

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Glimpse of the Past – LDS Church History April 14-20

Posted by on Apr 15, 2011 in Glimpse of the Past - LDS Church History | 0 comments

April 18, 1830 – Late in April the Prophet Joseph visited Joseph Knight, at Colesville, Broome Co., N. Y., where, under the Prophet’s administration, the first miracle was wrought in this dispensation. April 20, 1838 – Apostles Heber C. Kimball and Orson Hyde sailed from Liverpool, England, for America on the ship Garrick. They arrived in New York May 12th, and at Kirtland, O., May 22nd. April 14, 1840 – At a council of the Apostles held at Preston, England, Willard Richards was ordained one of the Twelve Apostles. April 15, 1840 – Apostle Orson Hyde left Commerce, Ill., on his mission to Jerusalem. Apriil 17, 1840 – The first British patriarch was ordained, P. Melling. Taken from Andrew Jenson’s:  Church...

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Glimpse of the Past – LDS Church History April 7-13

Posted by on Apr 15, 2011 in Glimpse of the Past - LDS Church History | 0 comments

April 7, 1829 – Joseph Smith, jun., resumed the translation of the Book of Mormon, assisted by Oliver Cowdery as scribe, at Harmony.  Oliver Cowdery was called by revelation to assist Joseph Smith, jun., in his labors and stand by him in his difficulties. Oliver was also promised the gift of translating like Joseph, if he desired it. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 6.) April 7, 1829 -The Lord revealed to Joseph Smith, jun., that John, the beloved Disciple, was given power over death, that he might live and bring souls to Christ and to prophesy before nations, kindreds, tongues and people until the coming of Christ in his glory. (Doc. and Cov., Sec. 7.) April 11, 1830 – Oliver Cowdery preached the first public discourse delivered by any of the Elders in this dispensation. The meeting was held in the house of Peter Whitmer, sen., at Fayette. Hiram Page, Catherine Page, Christian Whitmer, Annie Whitmer, Jacob Whitmer and Elizabeth Whitmer were baptized by Oliver Cowdery, in Seneca lake. April 7, 1837 – The city plat of Far West, Caldwell County, Mo., having been surveyed, the sale of town lots was left to Wm. W. Phelps, John Whitmer and Edward Partridge. Jacob Whitmer, Elisha H. Groves and Geo. M. Hinkle were appointed a building committee for the erection of a house of the Lord at Far West. Taken from Andrew Jenson’s:  Church...

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