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Teen Travel Contest 2018

Posted by on 3:05 am in Uncategorized | 0 comments

We are excited to hear from the valiant youth of today via insightful essays submitted to our contest – PRIZE is ONE SEAT on our JULY 28-AUGUST 3, 2018 MISSOURI to NAUVOO to WINTER QUARTERS Tour which includes 2 pageants in Nauvoo! Youth 14-19 years (age as of July 28, 2018) are eligible to submit an essay. Winning “Heroes from History” essays will highlight specific examples from the 1800’s LDS Church History and/or the youth’s own family history of that era.  Describe what these heroes have done and how you can apply their valiant examples to your life today and in the future.  Contest starts January 22, 2018 and entries must be submitted by February 28, 2018. PLEASE SHARE THIS CONTEST INFORMATION WITH THE VALIANT YOUTH IN YOUR LIFE–let’s give these amazing young people a hand and a boost to their testimony and understanding. Questions may be sent to info@mormonheritage.com.  Click on link below for more information and entry form. HEROES FROM HISTORY 2018 Essay Contest...

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GRAND PRIZE WINNER 2017 CHRISTMAS PAST!!!

Posted by on 7:00 am in Christmas Past 2017 | 0 comments

Congrats to 2017 GRAND PRIZE DRAWING WINNER, !!KACEY OLIEKAN!!, who won a seat on our Missouri to Nauvoo to Winter Quarters Tour! she can pick between either our June 23-29 OR July 28-Aug 3 – Missouri to Navuoo to Winter Quarters Tour!!  June tour visits Carthage Jail on martyrdom date; July tour attends TWO incredible pageants –  BOTH the Nauvoo Pageant & Truth Will Prevail – British Pageant! Please contact MHA office 801-272-5601 or info@mormonheritage.com within 30 days to arrange for how to receive your prize. Merry Christmas to everyone and thank you for participating in our annual Christmas Past Contest this year!  Incorporate a little bit of Christmas past into your celebrations and keep Lighting the...

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12th Day Christmas Past Winner & Answer

Posted by on 6:30 am in Christmas Past 2017 | 0 comments

Answer 12th Day Christmas Past: Joseph Smith’s Liberty Jail “temple prison” experience teaches us that “man’s extremity is God’s opportunity, and if we will be humble and faithful, if we will be believing and not curse God for our problems, He can turn the unfair and the inhumane and debilitating prisons of our life into temples- or at least bring comfort and revelation, divine companionship and peace.” – Elder Holland Congrats to 12th Day drawing winner, Belinda Abraham, who won an Olive wood Holy Family in a cave and Bethlehem ornament with Christmas cards from Nazareth Village!  Please contact MHA office 801-272-5601 or info@mormonheritage.com within 30 days to arrange for how to receive your prize.  Story still available on yesterday’s...

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12th Day Christmas Past Question & Story

Posted by on 9:39 am in Christmas Past 2017 | 19 comments

On the 12th & Final Day of Christmas Past, rekindling history to enhance today’s Light the World – “I was in prison and ye came unto me.” What can we learn from someone who spent Christmas in a Temple Prison? Grand Prize Winner will be drawn tomorrow from all the entries, after the 12th Day Daily Drawing Winner is announced.  To be entered into today’s daily giveaway & FREE tour drawing, Read the story below; “Comment” & “Share” your answer on Facebook or our blog. On December 1, 1838, the Prophet Joseph, his brother Hyrum, and several other brethren were imprisoned in Liberty Jail in Missouri on trumped-up charges of murder and overt acts of treason, none of which was ever proven against them.  The Prophet and his companions found themselves in very difficult circumstances.  Liberty Jail was a basement dungeon of approximately 14 feet by 14 feet with only a trapdoor entrance from the main floor.  The ceiling was so low that the men couldn’t stand fully upright and were forced to sit or lie on the dirty, straw-covered floor, their legs shackled. There was no stove for heating, and when they used an open fire, inadequate venting caused the room to fill with smoke, which made breathing difficult.  They had few blankets – certainly not enough to keep them warm in the freezing winter conditions – and the food was so bad they could hardly eat it.  It was a difficult time.  Joseph endured 5 months under these trying circumstances, including Christmas 1838. The prisoners had suffered a week in the jail when Emma brought her 6-year-old son, Joseph, to visit.  Having no means by which to travel, Emma had borrowed a two-seat carriage and a “beautiful span of cream horses” to cover the 40 miles from Far West to Liberty.  With her were Phoebe Rigdon and Phoebe’s young son, John.  John remembered, “We started rather late in the morn and did not get to the jail til after dark and they would not let us go in till the next morn.  After taking breakfast at the hotel we were taken to the jail and there remained for three days.” Emma was able to make a return visit on December 20, just before Christmas.  In the midst of such dire circumstances, the prisoners were cheered by the presence of their loved ones.  Joseph asked Emma if she could possibly bring some blankets for him.  But the request reduced her to tears because the mob had recently attacked her home and destroyed all but two of her blankets.  If she brought those to Joseph, then their children would go without.  Emma’s visits were the closest the family got to a Christmas celebration that year. Just a week before Christmas, Joseph wrote words of encouragement to the Saints from the dungeon.  “Therefore God hath made broad our shoulders for the burden.  We glory in our tribulation, because we know that God is with us, that He is our friend, and that He will save our souls.”  Because of Joseph’s eventual triumph over these unjust and difficult events and the revelation and comfort the Lord gave to him while he was imprisoned, Liberty Jail has come to be known as a temple prison. Taken from: Porter, “Remembering Christmas Past”, p....

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11th Day Christmas Past Winner & Answer

Posted by on 9:23 am in Christmas Past 2017 | 0 comments

Answer 11th Day Christmas Past: The Alvarez family wanted to invite Christ into their home for Christmas.  On a family home evening closest to Christmas they’d invite & recognize someone who had been a special example of Christ to them. Congrats to 11th Day drawing winner, Margaret Ford, who won an Olive wood Holy Family carving in a star with Christmas tree ornament!  Please contact MHA office 801-272-5601 or info@mormonheritage.com within 30 days to arrange for how to receive your prize.  Story still available on yesterday’s...

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11th Day Christmas Past Question & Story

Posted by on 3:37 pm in Christmas Past 2017 | 13 comments

On the 11th Day of Christmas Past, rekindling history to enhance today’s Light the World – “That which ye have seen me do even that shall ye do.”  Question:  What creative way did the Alvarez family see others doing as Christ would do? To be entered into today’s daily giveaway & FREE tour drawing- Read the story below; “Comment” & “Share” your answer on Facebook or our blog. “Christmas with ‘Christ'” Recollections of the Past – Elder Lino Alvarez “Although we were not able to do it every year, we always tried to keep in touch with our family, and were able to teach our children about the importance of sharing this beautiful season with our beloved ones.  The experiences we shared together were great opportunities for our children to get to know their grandparents, uncles, aunts, and cousins and to strengthen our family ties. It was wonderful for our children to be able to see & hear their grandparents share their testimonies of Jesus Christ as well as the priceless teachings they had gained through their lives.  Their beautiful family histories helped us to know them better and to love them more.  We loved to watch our children light their sparklers and enjoy with their cousins the delicious Mexican food and treats. The most important experiences for us were those when, with our children, we talked about Christ’s life and his teachings in order to live more closely in accordance with his example.  There were times we could not visit with our extended family and we stayed together in our own home and tried to find ways to see Christ in our fellowmen. One thing we enjoyed was “inviting Christ” to our family home evening the Monday before Christmas.  In a family council some time earlier, we would select a family or individual from our ward whom we could invite to our home evening closest to Christmas Day.  We always invited those who had been a good influence in our lives, whose Christlike behavior was a good example to follow. At the start of our home evening, we explained to our guests that it was a special night for us, a night in which we wanted to invite Christ into our home, and that we were in fact inviting them because their lives were symbolic of Christ’s life.  We told them with humbled hearts that they had been a good example to us of how to live as the Savior lived. Every time we did so, we felt the Spirit of Christ flooding our home and hearts.  The friendship and love for our guests were strenghtened and we made effort to follow their good example throughout the year.” Taken from: Christmas Treasures – Stories and Reminiscences from General Authorities p....

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10th Day Christmas Past Winner & Answer

Posted by on 10:15 am in Christmas Past 2017 | 0 comments

Answer 10th Day Christmas Past: Both individuals in the stories were given food when in desperate physical need but also shown kindness and friendship which fed their spirits as well. Congrats to 10th Day drawing winner, Kathy Wilcox, who won a Kirtland prize set – 2 books by Karl Ricks Anderson, 2 Kirtland Christmas ornaments & a Bethlehem olive wood ornament!  Please contact MHA office 801-272-5601 or info@mormonheritage.com within 30 days to arrange for how to receive your prize.  Story still available on yesterday’s...

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10th Day Christmas Past Question & Story

Posted by on 9:29 am in Christmas Past 2017 | 16 comments

On the 10th Day of Christmas Past, rekindling history to enhance today’s Light the World – “For I was hungered and ye gave me meat.”  Question:  How were “those that were hungered” given meat in these two stories? To be entered into today’s daily giveaway & FREE tour drawing- Read the story below; “Comment” & “Share” your answer on Facebook or our blog. “December 1856 (with the Martin handcart Company in Wyoming)” Recollections of the Past – Patience Loader Rozsa Archer “It was supper time and we were hungry and without food, when a good brother came to our campfire.  He asked if mother had no husband and she told him her husband had died two months ago and was buried on the Plains.  The brother had been standing with his hands behind him.  He then handed us a nice piece of beef to cook for supper.  He left and came back with a beef bone and said, ‘Here is a bone to make some soup, and don’t quarrel over it.’  Mother said, ‘oh brother, we never quarrel over short rations, but we are very thankful to you for giving us this meat, as we do not have any and have not expected any.'”  From:  Pioneer Christmas p. 38 “The Long Line of the Lonely” President Thomas S. Monson boyhood memories “I have many memories of my boyhood. Anticipating Sunday dinner was one of them. Just as we children hovered at our so-called starvation level and sat anxiously at the table, with the aroma of roast beef filling the room, Mother would say to me, “Tommy, before we eat, take this plate I’ve prepared down the street to Old Bob and hurry back.” I could never understand why we couldn’t first eat and later deliver his plate of food. I never questioned aloud but would run down to Bob’s house and then wait anxiously as his aged feet brought him eventually to the door. Then I would hand him the plate of food. He would present to me the clean plate from the previous Sunday and offer me a dime as pay for my services. My answer was always the same: “I can’t accept the money. My mother would tan my hide.” He would then run his wrinkled hand through my blond hair and say, “My boy, you have a wonderful mother. Tell her thank you.” You know, I think I never did tell her. I sort of felt Mother didn’t need to be told. She seemed to sense his gratitude. I remember, too, that Sunday dinner always seemed to taste a bit better after I had returned from my errand. Old Bob came into our lives in an interesting way. He was a widower in his eighties when the house in which he was living was scheduled to be demolished. I heard him tell my grandfather his plight as the three of us sat on the old front-porch swing. With a plaintive voice, he said to Grandfather, “Mr. Condie, I don’t know what to do. I have no family. I have no place to go. I have no money.” I wondered how Grandfather would answer. Slowly he reached into his pocket and took from it that old leather purse from which, in response to my hounding, he had...

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9th Day Christmas Past Question & Story

Posted by on 8:30 am in Christmas Past 2017 | 20 comments

On the 9th Day of Christmas Past, rekindling history to enhance today’s Light the World – “A man’s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth.”  Question:  In these short pioneer Christmas histories, how can our attitude change today about possessing an abundance? To be entered into today’s daily giveaway & FREE tour drawing- Read the story below; “Comment” & “Share” your answer on Facebook or our blog. “Christmas In Gentile Valley” 1890’s personal history of Lydia Bennett Egbert, Gentile Valley (Thatcher), Idaho “What a spectacular sight it would be for today’s generation to look in upon a remote little group as they gathered for their Christmas celebration.  Sleigh loads of people, snug in their quilts spread over a bed of hay, pulling into the Church-yard—men unhitching the teams and tying them to feed—women and children trudging through the snow and up the steps into the small one-room meetinghouse.  And inside, the hearty hand-clasping and exchanging of greetings around the roaring hot fire.  Men in stiff-front shirts and tight-legged trousers, standing comfortably with their backs to the stove and their hands clasped behind them, teetering on their toes and grinning from ear to ear in admiration of their charming females. Charming to be sure.  On that day of all days, when every female was adorned in a new Christmas frock.  Women, stiffly corseted, with their long flowing skirts were grouped about chatting merrily.  Maidens with bustles and leg-of-mutton sleeves modestly portrayed their most elegant manner in hopes of attracting the gallant gents.  Little girls, quaint in their new togs, strutted like peacocks. By one o’clock long tables, extending full length of the hall, had been set.  Everyone feasted to their heart’s content.  At two o’clock the old fiddle struck up its favorite, “Turkey In the Straw,” and, unable to resist, many of the oldsters chose partners and joined the children in their rollicking hoe-down.”  From: Pioneer Christmas p. 7-8 “Wagon Wheel Stockings” Mary Jane Perkins Wilson Autobiography Dec 25, 1880 at Hole in the Rock, UT “It was here in ‘Hole in the Rock’ that we spent our first Christmas holidays.  We children had no place only on the wagon wheels to hang our stockings.  Nevertheless old St. Nicholas visited us with parched corn and some cookies which were baked in the dutch ovens.  However everybody was happy.  We spent most of the day gathering sagebrush to build fires at night to dance by.  It was not of course on waxed floors, nor wearing various colored pumps, but it was on the sand rocks and some were barefooted.  Brother Charles E. Walton was the orchestra.  Sometimes he played the violin and other times the cornet.”  From:  Pioneer Christmas p. 22 “Clothespin Doll” 1886 from Willow Creek, Idaho James A Smith and his wife, Annie Sellars Smith, left their home in Utah and settled in Willow Creek, about 12 miles northeast of Idaho Falls, in 1886.  Their eight-year-old daughter, Mamie, took a special interest in her younger sister, Clara, and the two played together endlessly.  Mamie was heartbroken this Christmas to think that little Clara would not get a doll.  The little family was snowbound and their Christmas celebration would consist of homemade candy, apples, a cheerful fire and music. However, Christmas morning found a little...

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8th Day Christmas Past Winner & Answer

Posted by on 1:49 am in Christmas Past 2017 | 0 comments

Answer 8th Day Christmas Past: A young pioneer girl brought the gift of laughter to her family by making a costume for her sister’s dog to wear. Congrats to 8th Day drawing winner, Kay Peel, who won an Olive wood Holy Family carving & Christmas tree ornament!  Please contact MHA office 801-272-5601 or info@mormonheritage.com within 30 days to arrange for how to receive your prize.  Story still available on yesterday’s...

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